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Script Genres > English Children > Narration > Tours

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    Mobile

    Script:

    When I say the word sculpture, what do you think of? Maybe a statue made out of marble or bronze. But look up … this is a sculpture, too…called a mobile. Its name is Four Winds, and the artist who made it is Alexander Calder. His friends called him Sandy. He was the first artist ever to make a mobile! Calder was American, but a French friend of his made up the word mobile. Calder loved to play and make cool art. He even made toys that are works of art. This mobile is fun because it's a sculpture that hangs in the air … so a breeze or even air conditioning can make it move. And when it moves, it changes. Walk around and look at it from different sides. It will be a little different every time you look at it. Isn't Four Winds is a great name for a sculpture that moves in the air! Maybe he called it Four Winds because it has four arms … for north, south, east, and west winds. Can you guess what it's made out of? Think for a minute. Metal! Aluminum to be exact, and steel wires. But it's not heavy … in fact, it seems like it's floating. That's because it's balanced so perfectly. The weight of pieces on one side balance pieces on the opposite side. It's pretty complicated to do. But Calder wants you to see its beauty too. Here's what he said: "To most people who look at a mobile, it's no more than a series of flat objects that move. To a few people, though, it may be poetry." A poem…hanging in the air. Pretty cool idea!

    79 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Roger1's recording

    I'm interested in any feedback, but in particular, there is a quote from the artist towards the end of the script. Any opinions on how to deal with that? If I keep my regular voice, it is hard to tell where the quote ends, but If I change tone to indicate a quote, would that sound too much like I am trying to do an impression of him?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-97075/script-recording-76591.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Watch the pronunciation of "mobile".

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/mobile?s=t

    The verb meaning motion would be "MO-bl".
    The sculpture is a "mo-BEEL".

    The only time I've actually heard "mobile" pronounced "MO-BYEL" is in the Who song "Goin' Mobile" by Pete Townshend. Other than that, that particular pronunciation must be a regionalism of some sort.

    As for the quote, there are a few different ways of attacking it.
    -Slightly alter your voice - darker, breathier, a slightly higher or lower pitch, nasal or round toned and booming.
    -Speed/Pace - quicker or slower, with a slightly longer pause before and after to set it off from the rest of the narrative. (The introduction or set up is already there: "Here's what he said:", so a little pause at the finish of the quote with a finality of inflection finishes it off.)
    -With an accent of some sort, if that is in your comfort zone - since Calder's background is easily researched, you might determine what part of the country he hails from and formulate an appropriate regional accent.
    -Change the age (younger or older than yourself) and/or energy of of the delivery (up and bright or plodding and maudlin or contemplative)
    -Or some combination of the above.

    AND: I know I will probably get slammed for this. But that little laugh bugs me, even though this is narrative and not commercial copy. I have referenced Nancy Wolfson in some of my previous comments about her take on laughing or chuckling in a voice over.

    And now I have a second confirmation. I recently attended a SAG Foundation VO Lab mock in-studio audition session conducted by a booth director/casting director who has also directed over 350 commercial VO sessions that have gone on to be broadcast. One of the participants read a piece of copy and put a little titter or laugh in there. His comment was "Don't! Ever! Unless it is specifically written into the direction, i.e. 'And here, So and So laughs...' " As a voice artist, you can achieve the effect you were going for by just putting that smile and sense of astonishment into your voice without the laugh. Laughing is a comment, which could have taken as condescending or superior sounding, even though that may not have been your intention.

    Altogether different if we can see you.

    Peer Feedback:

    I could listen to your accent all day; makes me smile :) I'm far too biased to have listened critically! You had me artist.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Jamesromick for the feedback. Turns out that "mo-byel" is the British pronounciation, hence the Peter Townsend song, and as good subjects of the Queen we use that form here in Canada. I'll watch that when doing auditions for US jobs. And no more laughing!
    And thanks Bean420. Accent is east coast Canadian, but I will be taking lessons on how to lose it.

    Peer Feedback:

    -how to control it! There's still a market for both :)

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    printer friendly version edit
    Dora The Explorer

    Script:

    Welcome to Dora the Explorer, Live! brought to you by Dodge Caravan and Crest Spin-brush. Dora and Boots would like you to know that flash photography, or using video cameras is strictly prohibited. Dora is going to need your help on her adventure today, so hold on to your flags and enjoy the show! Thank you.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    printer friendly version edit
    Mobile

    Script:

    When I say the word sculpture, what do you think of? Maybe a statue made out of marble or bronze. But look up … this is a sculpture, too…called a mobile. Its name is Four Winds, and the artist who made it is Alexander Calder. His friends called him Sandy. He was the first artist ever to make a mobile! Calder was American, but a French friend of his made up the word mobile. Calder loved to play and make cool art. He even made toys that are works of art. This mobile is fun because it's a sculpture that hangs in the air … so a breeze or even air conditioning can make it move. And when it moves, it changes. Walk around and look at it from different sides. It will be a little different every time you look at it. Isn't Four Winds is a great name for a sculpture that moves in the air! Maybe he called it Four Winds because it has four arms … for north, south, east, and west winds. Can you guess what it's made out of? Think for a minute. Metal! Aluminum to be exact, and steel wires. But it's not heavy … in fact, it seems like it's floating. That's because it's balanced so perfectly. The weight of pieces on one side balance pieces on the opposite side. It's pretty complicated to do. But Calder wants you to see its beauty too. Here's what he said: "To most people who look at a mobile, it's no more than a series of flat objects that move. To a few people, though, it may be poetry." A poem…hanging in the air. Pretty cool idea!

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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