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The Voice Actor Feedback Forum

Script Genres > English Adult > Narration > Tours

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    Atlanta Fed Guide

    Script:

    Script Notes:The guide should sound friendly, upbeat, and knowledgeable, as they will provide instruction and storyline content.
    Script:When communities exchange
    goods, services, labor, and money,
    with each other, the economy flows
    with a good groove.

    At a simple level the economy flows between
    consumers … businesses … and
    banks. That’s you…

    In this four round game, each player
    must increase their own Net worth by
    5%.

    OK, so let’s go with the flow…

    Time for Round 2 —

    With more debt, our Consumer
    family needs more income… So, get
    a job!

    Meanwhile, the Bank will evaluate
    the risk in some consumer loans.

    Here we go!

    61 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear KMO's recording

    The home studio quality is sub-par and on my to do list. I'm mostly interest in feedback on the actual reading. Thank you, all.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/KMO_Fed_Tour.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a great voice! I think if you add more of an upbeat tone to this piece it would be even better than it is now. I'm looking forward to hearing your second recording!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice relaxed and authentic delivery for the most part. Two small critiques -- no need to put the final consonant on "Round" before saying "2" Also, don't add pauses within phrases where there is no punctuation. You do this a couple of times which breaks up the flow.

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    Belt With Flowers And Cartouche

    Script:

    This artist takes Raphael's picture as his model, but does away with the poetry and idealization, rendering her instead as an object of desire. Take a moment to look at its fine details: the pattern of tiny flowers woven with silver and gold silk thread…the silver border… and the rectangles, or cartouches, lined in red. Each displays a word from a passionate love poem. The basic design for the belt with flowers and cartouche came from a popular pattern book of the 16th century, indicated here by the precision of the embroidery. But the lettering is irregular and slightly misshapen, suggesting that whoever wove this belt chose the poem and also added the phoenixes, working without any kind of template

    94 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Beverly Ann's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-14416/script-recording-79094.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The read is interesting. i could have used a little more investment in the imagery - painting the picture for me, so to speak. The editing also makes the delivery choppy.

    What is disturbing about the editing is the snipping out of breaths and/or use of a noise gate or de-breather. It's too severe. There's voice (with a little noise fuzz underneath), then zero sound, then voice again. It creates a "pumping" effect that is unsettling to the listener. Those "gaps" (which I suspect are edited breath sounds) should be filled with room tone to lessen or eliminate that pumping effect.

    Right from the top, there is also quite a bit of mouth noise, mostly lip smack and tongue/cheek sounds, some of which could be judiciously edited out. But, again, replaced with room tone.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your comments are interesting as I do not understand what you are listening to. I do not "snip out breaths" use a noise gate or de-breather actually I did very little editing. I also do not hear lip smacks and tongue/cheek sounds.

    I am hopeful someone else will review and comment, if they have the same interpretation of my read then I will need to reassess my performance.

    Peer Feedback:

    A de-breather plugin is essentially a noise gate. You set the parameters - attack, volume threshold, release, frequency range, etc - to catch the frequencies the plugin detects as breaths to minimize them. The settings can be very tricky. Too severe, and the sound is totally eliminated - effectively shutting off the volume, no sound - which is what I'm hearing (or not hearing) here. De-breather plugins are usually used to minimize breath sounds (most often for singing vocals) and not necessarily to eliminate them. And they are not fool proof and aren't always effective no matter what the literature says. The effect here sounds like the breaths were completely edited out of the recording leaving gaps of total silence where the were. It is also clipping off some beginnings and ends of words and phrases before and after where the breaths were giving what might otherwise be a nice read a certain choppiness. If you watch your meter during playback, those gaps will barely register a blip.

    Using a noise gate to eliminate background noise is pretty much frowned upon by sound engineers who engineer for VO. Again, the settings are tricky and if set too severely, it completely eliminates all sound, causing complete silence. It's like walking into a pitch black room from a brightly lighted one and slamming the door - no light. The on (sound) and off (no sound) effect is very disturbing, especially on long form recordings. It's that "pumping" effect.

    It is not my intention to be mean or cruel, it's just an observation of a, sometimes, audio engineer. I too hope that someone else might confirm and/or concur or refute what my aged ears are hearing.

    Peer Feedback:

    It sounded pretty decent without headphones, with headphones, there was definitely some weirdness. I could still hear your breaths, but there were times when the start and ends of some things would buzz like a noise gated piece.

    There is some big noises at the beginning, and I can't tell if it's mouth noise or whatever tech thing is going on that james was describing.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you both for your comments, I really appreciate you guys taking the time, I need to have someone check my audio since you both are hearing noise that I don't or maybe I'm just getting too deaf.

    Peer Feedback:

    Try listening with a good pair of Headphones and turn them up very loud just for the editing process.

    Peer Feedback:

    I listened without headphones and can also hear the clicky mouth noises. I may be pretty picky though, as I have the same problem and get frustrated by my own clicky-ness.

    Peer Feedback:

    Clicky-ness!!!! Ugh, it makes me want to hate spit. Well at least while I'm reading. So everyone's commented on the technical matters. Let me just say that I LOVE your voice. Your register is in the range that I find super great for female voice artists. Yours is terrific. Now mood. Raphael is rendering his model as an object of desire. I thought there could have been much more of that "desire" tone in your voice. A softer voice with a hint of gentleness in your delivery of the words and concepts. I felt the "voice" of this copy was pretty soft and sweet but, IMO, there was just a little too much push in your tone and delivery for that to be felt very much. I would just suggest, for the hell of it, put a fair bit of kindness and tenderness in this read. With the voice you have, oh man, that would be some audio I would listen to over and over. Give it a try! : )

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    California State Park

    Script:

    California State Parks

    Welcome to the California State Park’s Directory of Natural Resources. California’s parks are here for the entire family to enjoy. They’re your parks, and we urge you to abide by basic conservation guidelines. On days designated as “dry days,” please do not light matches or start fires of any kind in any of our parks. The threat of forest fires is of constant concern to California Foresters. Campfires are permitted, but in designated Campfire Zones only. All state parks are open at 7 a.m. and close at sundown. Please adhere to this rule for your own safety and protection. We would like you to come back often and take advantage of California’s great outdoors. After all, you make it work.

    43 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Trying out a new genre and working on the audio chain. How does the mic sound? Any room noise? Thanks in advance for any and all feedback. All the best, Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-32658.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording quality sounded good, no room noise I could detect. Delivery was good, liked the gentler tone given the severity of the message. Might be a tad fast but then I'm not a director so what do I know...

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback. Appreciate your time. Tried to make the read sort of, "fatherly".

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    How about "big brother?" Nice delivery throughout!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Henry! Nice to hear from you.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice Scott! Also wanted to congratulate you on winning 2nd place in last week's contest. I told you your voice is good for this industry! LOL!

    All the best,
    LCW

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a sincere tone and I believe what you're saying so kudos to your read!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks to everyone for the comments and encouragement!

    Thanks also to LCW and Nick for comments on my first reading of the Sunglasses Contest entry. Because of your comments I did a second version, reposted, and that was the one that got the second prize!

    All the best,

    Scott

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    California State Parks

    Script:

    Welcome to the California State Park’s Directory of Natural Resources. California’s parks are here for the entire family to enjoy. They’re your parks, and we urge you to abide by basic conservation guidelines. On days designated as “dry days,” please do not light matches or start fires of any kind in any of our parks. The threat of forest fires is of constant concern to California Foresters. Campfires are permitted, but in designated Campfire Zones only. All state parks are open at 7 a.m. and close at sundown. Please adhere to this rule for your own safety and protection. We would like you to come back often and take advantage of California’s great outdoors. After all, you make it work.

    110 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear marcus250's recording

    Hi! This is my first checkup. I'm heading toward a Narration Demo (at some point), and am excited to receive your feedback. Thank you!!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-90846/script-recording-83702.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Marcus -
    pace seemed too slow. I think this should sound more "conversational" and less instructional - less stiff sounding.

    BTW, your voice is a good fit and sounds good. just speed it up a little IMO.

    cheers,
    DS

    Peer Feedback:

    I actually liked the pace -it was a bit over articulated and punched in certain places, but for the average tourist, I think it totally works and those are easy pick ups. Your sentence endings had a little trouble with being supported throughout, and I thought you could have given a little more pause to some spots that would give it a little bit more of an idea separation, but I think this is really nice.

    Peer Feedback:

    I actually really enjoyed your read. Let me ask you, as you were reading, who was your audience and where do you see this being displayed? I would assume at a Rangers Station or some sort of check in station, maybe with an accompanying video played on a loop, and if that is the case I would increase the pace a bit. I thought you sounded very personable and didn't feel like I was being read too. Maybe smile a bit more just to put that cherry on top!

    Peer Feedback:

    Good voice and overal interpretation of the material. However, I would have preferred a more conversational, laid-back approach to the delivery. There are times when it felt that you were going for an authoritarian interpretation when I feel a friendly approach is needed.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks to all of you for this feedback! :) After so many years working in the Disney World parks, I'm finding it difficult Not to sound like the Monorail announcer! lol

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice sounding voice, just relax and make it more conversational. It sounded a little rigid, like staccato if you were playing piano. A little more rhythm and pace perhaps a bit more speed and you're there. Your voice has a believable sound.

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    Hugo Scheiber

    Script:

    Portrait of a Woman –1929
    Hugo Scheiber 1873-1950

    The vivid colors of Portrait of a Woman are a constant feature throughout Scheiber's work. Details such as the rippling waves of hair and Scheiber's spontaneous and active brush strokes are characteristic of Scheiber's Futurist oeuvre of the 1920's. German Expressionism and Futurism were the primary influences of this Hungarian painter. But he met resistance from the conventional tastes in his homeland. In 1919, with a successful exhibition in the Héveshy Salon, and publications of his works in 1921 in Der Sturm, Germany's foremost avant-garde magazine, recognition ensued.

    33 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jdaddona's recording

    Looking for general performance feedback on a practice guided museum tour. There are several foreign terms and names. I tried to be accurate in pronouncing them, listening to them from several sources. Thank you all. Jan

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3357/script-recording-23972.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Jan, I liked your performance a lot. Your voice is attractive and your speech is very articulate. The tone you gave the read came across as sophisticated and real - matching the script perfectly. As for the foreign terms you mentioned, I couldn't say whether they were pronounced accurately or not.. but they sounded great to me. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    very nice read! I liked the way the words rolled off your tongue. Smooth. I did hear some artifacts from either compression or mouth noise, not sure which, but it was noticable. Overall tho .... good job and nice pacing for narration.

    Peer Feedback:

    Agreed, nice job. The foreign words were a mystery to me. Sounded great though.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice has a nice sophistication, and the read was excellent, fit the copy to a tee. Did notice a few crackles in places, recording artifacts from something. The first "P" , "portrait" in the copy "popped", but it didn't happen elsewhere. Other than that, a nice clean and pleasant recording.

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    Library Preservation

    Script:

    Our knowledge of ourselves and the world around us grows only through the accumulation of countless bits of information, laid down like bricks as a foundation for wisdom. Libraries are the intellectual brickyards of our civilization, fundamental to our survival and growth. This is the largest library in the world. More than 84 million items are housed in three buildings on 535 miles of shelves. The accumulated facts, fantasies, philosophies, and fears of mankind are brought here in every medium yet devised to record information.

    13 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Sherrill S's recording

    This the the first practice recording I have done, so I would like comments on both the recording quality and my performance. Thanks so much!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-12306/script-recording-51845.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You did just fine for your first recording. You speak well and have a nice voice. One thing you want to be wary of is putting too much emphasis on words. In conversation you can get away with it but when recording you have to be careful about overemphasizing.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Richurd. I will keep that in mind. I do have a tendency to read with a lot of inflection and emphasis. Probably habits from being a school librarian.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ditto what Richurd said re: overemphasizing. Nice voice! I hope my first recording (when I take the plunge and get my mic) sounds a fraction as nice! Where are you in your process? I just had my career session with Carol.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Sherill. I'm new to this whole voiceover thing, but here's what I noticed: I agree with Richurd that you have a nice voice. I also think the recording quality sounds good. To me, the read came across a little stilted, perhaps like you were concentrating too hard on getting all the words just right. As a result it doesn't flow as much as it would if you were just having a conversation with someone. Hope this helps!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Tonia and bquesada. I've been learning VO for about a year and been with Edge since August (with December-January off for the holidays and family health issues). I have been working on being more free with my reads but my tendency for perfectionism leads me to over-think and over-work my reads.

    Peer Feedback:

    I hear you, Sherrill, on the perfectionism. My whole life is one big over-thinking party--the kind of party one would rather skip! I figure if I'm going to have critical voices in my head all day maybe I can replace them with VO. :)

    I just joined edge in late Dec, or maybe it was January. I've been sick with flu and bronchitis for weeks and weeks, so I'm really just starting to dig in.

    Glad to "meet" you!

    Peer Feedback:

    Tonia - Your comments made me chuckle! May you feel better soon. There is nothing worse than trying to talk when sick with bronchitis. Glad to "meet" you too.

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    Metropolitan Museum Guided Tour - Architecture

    Script:

    Welcome to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to its Great Hall, one of the most magnificent interior public spaces in New York City. I'm Michael Chadwick, and I'll be your guide for the special audio tour we've created about the Museum's architecture. Find a comfortable place to stand while I tell you a bit about the history of this remarkable building.

    Of the many architects who have worked on this building, Richard Morris Hunt was among the most prominent. Hunt was the first American architect to study at the prestigious École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His legacy at the Metropolitan can be seen in the Museum's stately façade, the Grand Staircase leading up to the second floor, and the vast, ceremonial space of the Great Hall, in which you are now standing. The Metropolitan demonstrates Hunt's mastery of the Beaux-Arts style, an architecture particularly suited to civic buildings at the end of the nineteenth century. Named after the school in Paris, the style is distinguished by its unified treatment of interior and exterior spaces and by its references to traditional, classical forms. In the Great Hall, many details are classically inspired. For example, the four pedimented niches overflowing with flowers—which originally were intended to display classical sculpture; the elegant colonnades, or rows of columns, which lead to the Museum's galleries; and the domes, which correspond to the three massive arched windows that define the Museum's façade. If you'd like to hear more about Richard Morris Hunt—one of America's first internationally renowned architects—press the green play button now.

    26 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MikeChdwck71's recording

    I am interested in feedback on whether this is a possibility for the narration demo, audio tour portion of it.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/MikeChdwck71_Met_Guided_Tour_0.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello Mike
    It sounds pretty good for my ears. Very easy to listen to, maybe the very first sentence is a bit rushed but overall I liked it a lot.
    regards
    Balazs

    Peer Feedback:

    The more I listen to this, the more the bass balance bothers me. I would love to get suggestions from anyone out there using Audacity, on how to take the "tunnel of mud" out of this.

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    Morton Arboretum

    Script:

    Welcome to Morton Arboretum, home to more than 36 hundred native trees, shrubs, and plants. This virtual guide provides a snapshot of what to expect when you visit our Wheaton, Illinois location. First, let’s look at how to get the most from your online tour.

    79 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear micahtouchet's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-90296/script-recording-81919.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good sounding quality. Seems like there is a touch of mouth noise. Stay hydrated!!

    Good job!

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    Multi-script practice demo

    Script:

    I took all scripts from the "New to Voice Over?" page. I recorded them all more than once and kept what I felt was the best take, then compiled them together for one demo reel.

    30 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear AlexisJavor's recording

    As a beginner, I skipped around to try different kinds of narration. This is my first ever attempt at voice over recordings and I was a bit nervous. Appreciate all feedback, kind and harsh. :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-27304/script-recording-47507.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds great ..... welcome to the forum!

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree and echo Dan's welcome!

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    New England Gravestone Art Audio Tour - Voices123 Project

    Script:

    Poet and New-Englander Robert Frost skillfully describes the modern day visitation of burying grounds along Boston’s Freedom Trail:

    The living come with grassy tread
    To read the gravestones on the hill;
    The graveyard draws the living still,
    But never anymore the dead.

    But what do these graves tell us about the people who once walked these cemeteries, not as tourists but as the neighbors and loved ones of those buried here? As you walk around the cemetery, look closely at the images carved on the graves. Can you find a gravestone with skull and crossbones? This design is called the “death’s head.” As the first Europeans to settle in New England in the 1600’s, the Puritans decorated their gravestones with the death’s head.

    84 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear mikedavis's recording

    Recently started my voice acting career. I worked with John Burr Voice Dynamics and have demos at mikedavisvoiceovers.com I have submitted several auditions on Voice123.com but have gotten no traction at all. I listened in on Voice Over Virtual's coaching session with David Goldberg and loved it. Please let me know what you think. Thanks, Mike Davis

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-80658/script-recording-63885.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Mike --
    I like your voice, and I like this read. the subject is unusual and pretty cool.
    Your delivery wasn't too bad, but was a little too linear - too monotone, I think.You came across as sort of tentative at the mic...
    I think you need to add more storyteller to it. after all, it's kind of interesting story and could be treated with a lighter tone, even though it's about gravestones.

    I heard a lot of breathing -- did you do this all in one take? You should consider editing those out, and don't be afraid of splicing multiple takes to get the best results.

    regarding V123 - I'm an advocate of auditioning your head off. It's great practice, both reading and engineering; you get a thick skin from overwhelming rejection (lol), and eventually you'll hit stride and start getting some jobs.

    just my 2c…

    cheers,
    Dave Saunders.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, Mike. I'm a student with Edge and am not working talent, yet, but I thought I'd chime in.

    Recording quality: Your space is a little lively with echoes. It needs treatment or you need a new spot, or something to get a drier sound.

    I'm hearing mouth noise and big breaths. What are you using to listen to your recordings? If you don't have good quality headphones, you should invest. For $100 you'll pick up what I'm hearing, too. Are you recording all in one take and not editing good takes together? Because that would be very difficult for a new talent on a piece of even this length.

    I love your soft tone. It's very soothing and pleasant, and it gives you lots of room for acting in longer narrative piece.

    You're "acting" out some words in a way that's not conversational/organic. Like the second half of the poem: you hit "living" and "anymore" and really liven them up with your voice, but in a narrative piece like this, you're not hitting product names and competing with road noise and conversation that a broadcast commercial is being played over, and "helping" words like this will bring the listener out of the piece and make them think of your voice instead of what they're listening to.

    Your words don't exactly match the script in a couple of places. Could be intentional edits on your part, or miss-typing in the script, but if it wasn't intentional, consider it with all of these comments. Might just be a matter of taking a little more time and care. Cuz there's lots of like, too. Your voice is lovely, and your timing, and sense of story.

    Good luck, and hope this is helpful!

    Peer Feedback:

    Good advice from the above two comments. I also hear the echo and oh how I hate that but it happens, I also hear the breathing and some background stuff. Voice is great, but editing is important. Many times I will read a line several times in the same take and then edit out the bad ones (and I STILL make mistakes in the final edit).which I need to work on myself. I agree with Tonia, headphones will make all the difference in what you hear.

    Peer Feedback:

    The room is clearly audible in the file. So is a decent amount of mouth noise. You should do whatever works for you in reducing that. Others mention editing out the breathing....definitely.

    I lean towards Dave's eval. It could use some more personality in the delivery...it's just a bit flat sounding. Voice is fine. But the delivery could use more personal touch.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you to everyone!
    Very valuable feedback. This is just what I needed and I will begin working on those improvements.
    Thanks again.
    Mike

    Peer Feedback:

    I do love your voice and up-close-and-personal style. Despite my criticisms, I felt a little like I was listening to the Garrison Keeler narrating the Writer's Almanac on NPR. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Something to consider if getting comments about “trash” sound, your not hearing on your system. First I agree with the above, Headphone, better speakers, blah blah blah,, the more and better options you have to listen the better. BUT that wont help with this next bit. Some computers .. like the one I'm on, have settings in the audio playback devises, that can mask the problem, so it wont play back to you,, but any time you send something else out... everyone else hears it. I’m on a windows machine, so if you are to, here's what you do... right click on the speaker control (normally on the lower right next to the time display.) A pop up box should come up, and you want “playback devices”... Right click on the one your using... and go to properties. In there, you have options like enhancements, and alike,, and inside each of those , are all items that change how your machine plays things back to you. So … how do you set it to normal??? Well with out some fancy equipment,,, there is no such thing. Every machine, every speaker, every device sounds different. So I play back things thru multiple devises and compare. I use my Iphone, my Ipad, My other computers,, and all my styles of headphone and earplugs,, and try to get them all to sound a like, and like “real life” ( which is subjective to each persons ears and so on....) My computer, had these “enhancements” active, and I did not know it until people made comment about sounds in my recordings that I could also not hear. It can effect it the other way as well, in there you can add re-verb, and bass,, that only is added to what your hearing out of your system,, and its not in the recordings, so it can trick you. So my suggestion is to turn all that crap off, if its on.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you knm_voice
    I use a mac with MBOX and Twistedwave. I have heard of these issues on Windows systems before. I can't use that excuse however!
    Thanks again.
    Mike

    Peer Feedback:

    I just got twistedwave on my Ipad! Looks alright

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    Plymouth Rock 2

    Script:

    It is a story – inspired by Plymouth Rock’s mythical place in history. Just as the rock has been invented, enhanced, revered and ridiculed over time, so these images and visual effects portray searching, analysis, humor and change.

    134 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear peterduranplease's recording

    This is my submission for last week's Script Contest. I read DG's writeup, but thought it might be valuable to hear from some of the participants, especially that week's winners-- Dave S.? -- about my read, and also from some of the forum audio buffs -- TxTom? sundance kid? James? -- about how it sounds. All feedback welcome. (Note: Director's notes available on the Script Contest page.) --Pete

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-55562/script-recording-76315.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Pete --
    thanks for the props....I was as surprised, as much as, I'm sure, everyone else was...

    I think this sounds great (and, you finish your words!). and the audio sounds very good as well to me. it's not over processed, no noticeable noise, reasonable recording levels.

    Since the pretext to this read is that it's an interactive museum narration, maybe it should be a little more animated?

    Your voice really reminds me of Peter Thomas (did I mention that already?)....

    cheers,
    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    Congrats to Dave.

    OK, Pete. Ya called me out. Now I'm gonna letcha have it!

    Well, actually, it's pretty darned good. But here are few nits to pick.

    The processing isn't as sharp as some of your past recordings. The S's are slightly lispy sounding - not a sharp sibilance - more so towards the end of the read than the beginning. However, the recording itself is quite clean.

    Going by DG's writeup:

    Your first four words were just a little swift, almost sounding like "Idiza story?" with a questioning inflection to it. If you hadn't paused (stretched out "story" and ignored the dash) and elided (the way you did with "revered and ridiculed") into the next part of the sentence (which is all part of the same thought), that questioning inflection may have translated more into wonder. And I'm assuming that's where you were going.

    "Just" came out as "Jist"

    Not much detectable breath pauses in the first list, but in the second it seemed that there was a breath at every comma where a glottal probably would have sufficed (or just edit out the breaths). (They are also both a list of 4, which isn't as usual as a list of 3, but each is still a separate thing. You kind of lumped the two connected by "and" together in both cases which kind of seemed like a list of 3 than 4.) And to DG's note about giving each their own little spin, that may have been a missing element here. It was kind of there, but maybe not subtly distinct enough. Dunno.

    Also, the overall tone is kind of somber (maybe reverent even) rather than instructive (or simply descriptive). That might have fallen into DG's "too serious" category.

    I would substitute Dave's, "maybe it should be a little more animated?" question into just lightening it up a little, with a little bright-eyed wonder of an inviting smile.

    Good stuff though.

    Peer Feedback:

    Dave, James: thanks for your responses.
    Re: processing, I wonder if it was my noise gate settings (... yep, I know, I know...but neither of you noticed it! --other than, possibly, this point), or maybe my declicker. Will play with it.

    Re: list intonation-- I wondered this too, James... but it seemed to me Dave, who won the contest, had a similar intonation on the first two items. Unsure.

    Re: "animated/lightened up"-- yea, that's probably it. Conversational for me seems to be not lively enough for a lot of folks, and in order to get what is wanted I think I have to learn to "dial it up" a bit.
    Thanks again,
    Pete

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    RedRocksaudiotour

    Script:

    Welcome to Red Rocks Park and amphitheatre. Around you are 868 acres of pines and prairie, spectacular vistas, and geological wonders. At 6,450 feet above sea level, Red Rocks is situated in A unique transitional zone where the Great Plains meet the Rocky Mountains. As the earth gradually moved together, the sandstone ledges that you see around you were raised from the prehistoric ocean floor to form these dramatic, three hundred-foot "walls."

    32 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Lenox Powell's recording

    I uploaded my recording of this for peer review yesterday (7-23-13) and received some really helpful and thoughtful feedback. I took that feedback and suggestions for adjustments and applied it to this updated take. I look forward to your feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/RedRocksaudioguidedtourtake2-072413.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Way better! Very smooth and pleasant with some added wonder and interest that's not overdone.

    I like your telephony contest read, too. It's the first contest I've entered, and I find it FASCINATING listening to all the different reads, all the different voices and choices. Sometimes I'll listen to all the reads people have done before on the forum scripts (some are very popular), but then there are something like 10 reads to compare, not 50 or 60!

    Anyway, great revision on this.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for your feedback, Randye! I so appreciate it.

    I'm hearing the "s's" as well. I'm trying to back off the mic so it's not so strong. I also ate a green apple to try and get rid of some mouth noise. :) I'll have to practice with toning down my sibilance.

    Your input about my recording environment was really helpful. My sound booth is a walk-in closet (on the smaller side), but I'm in the process of installing more sound-deadening (blankets on the walls, ceiling, etc.). So hopefully that will help reduce the echo-y, tinny sound. I'm not very knowledgeable on my mic technology yet. I may need to play with my mic position or the HPF hz on my pre-amp ...

    Who knew there was so much to a quality voice-over!? ;p

    Thanks again!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Tonia! Your feedback was great and helped a lot. I made note of all the comments I received and wrote them at the bottom of the script to ensure I wasn't forgetting any. So glad you were able to hear the difference!

    Peer Feedback:

    Seemed like the first "Welcome" line should be much bigger...stretched out a bit. I liked it much better when it got past that. Also, that first line was very mid-rangey (kinda thin). I saw that you mentioned a high-pass filter. I feel like your voice would benefit from having some low end so I would be careful not to have the high pass frequency set too high. The point of it is usually to remove rumble below where useful voice frequencies are. I definitely would not let it get too much above 100 - 150 hz.
    60 hz would probably be fine if it's a very sharp slope - say 12-18db /octave.

    Peer Feedback:

    I heard more of the wonder and awe in your voice this time, too. I agree with Touzet about the high-pass filter. If turning it down would give your voice more lows then that would be a good thing to do. I'm still only hearing you out of my left ear, though. Are you maybe using a mono mic with a stereo recorder?

    Peer Feedback:

    I can't comment on recording quality, as I'm a complete newbie, but it sounded good to me! I liked the performance choices you made - I could see the walls and the amphitheatre and the pines.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey all, THANK YOU so much for the feedback. It really helps. Touzet and Chris, thanks for the feedback about the high pass filter. It's actually set at about 60hz. I hear the thinness too, but not sure how to fix it. I'm calling my rep at Sweetwater tomorrow to trouble-shoot.

    My mic is connected to a pre-amp, which is then connected to an interface (Scarlett). I'm also only able to hear myself out of one of my desktop monitors, so not sure if I set something up wrong or what. Chris, that may be why you're only hearing me out of your left ear.

    Anyway, GREAT feedback. I SO appreciate it!

    Thanks!

    Lenox

    Peer Feedback:

    Yay, Lenox, for coming in third on the script contest! Woooo hoooo!

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    Rockwell - Colgate Toothpaste

    Script:

    At first glance, you may think this painting is another example of Rockwell telling a story about telling a story. But it's more than that… it's an advertisement. This painting was created as an ad for Colgate toothpaste.

    Rockwell understood that sometimes ads work better when you don't clunk people over the head with a hard sell.

    Rockwell used this wholesome scene of the two of you to sell an image of family and America that he hoped would make people feel warm and fuzzy and want to buy toothpaste.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mpinkney's recording

    This is my first time participating in the feedback forum. Your comments are welcome.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-1289/script-recording-38548.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    On performance: The delivery can verge into a sing-song pattern (around 00:18 to 00:28). So I would suggest that you pay attention to that aspect. If you do not do this already, you may consider making pause and cadence marks on the script itself. These will cue you when to emphasize key words and phrases and when to raise and lower the tone of your voice.

    On audio quality: Nice voice. I would suggest that you mitigate the breaths between words and phrases with a digital audio editor. Your articulation is very syllabant. The emphasis on the 'S' and 'T' sounds can overwhelm the audio at times. This could be limited with a slightly different mic placement, perhaps even backing off the mic. Overall, I think your tone is smooth and the quality of your voice is pleasantly complex in its texture.

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - I wasn't sure who was your audience. You read it as if you wanted to be very careful and gentle with it which made you sound overly cautious and not believable.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your mic sounds nice...voice clear. There were some odd upward inflections that didn't sound conversational "adverTISEment" in the second sentence. "ADvertisement" is the normal emphasis for most people. Sabrina is correct in your approach to the read...confidence will come as you practice more and more. However...something you will want to address immediately is the mouth noise...mouth clicks present throughout the read. Usually caused by the need to hydrate. There's lots of ways to work on that...drinking plenty of water is one. A granny smith apple right before reading is another, though the effects are short-lived. Don't drink a cup of tea or coffee right before...that causes a LOT of mouth noise. Welcome to the forum.

    Peer Feedback:

    Winstonking, Sabrinasvoice and TxTom, thank you all for the feedback. I really appreciate it and am glad to be a part of this forum.

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    Sochi Olympic Park - Bolshoi Ice Dome

    Script:

    Welcome to the Bolshoi Ice Dome. The literal translation of its Russian name is "Large Icy Palace,” but would be more natural in English as "Great Ice Dome."

    30 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear yankeeNH's recording

    This is my submission to this week's script contest (and THANK YOU to whoever it was that kindly let me know to delete this until after the deadline closed!!). This is my first recording submission of any kind (I'm just starting on my VO journey). This is a completely unvarnished, unprocessed recording done in a downtown hotel room on a Snowball USB surrounded by pillows and blanket over my head. In listening to other submissions, it appears I have a lot to learn on the technical side of things (the volume seems lower than some—maybe because there's no compression?). In time I will find a good mic and pre for my voice which won't hurt, but I want to avoid the "lipstick on a pig" trap—as in any craft, a great voice can make even substandard equipment sound good, right? Anyways—let 'er rip. :-)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-84354/script-recording-67871.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi yankeeNH --
    Letting it rip: Nice voice and nice delivery. You sound comfortable behind the mic.

    I'm pretty sure a director would do a couple takes here and there, but overall its a nice job.

    technically, it's not horrible either. I think you controlled the hotel room noise pretty well. I could hear a tiny bit of background but that's why we have a noise gate, right?

    Nice job, especially if it's first shot.

    cheers,
    Dave Saunders.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi yankeeNH (I'm not going to guess on how to spell your name, as I will probably be wrong!)
    Not a bad read-- my main impression was IF you were going by the director's notes for the context, I believe the word "dynamic" was requested (this will be announced for tourists as they enter an ice dome) and this sounds more subdued than dynamic. Then again, one could do this read with a different interpretation, but you indicated above that you'd submitted it. Additionally, you emphasized "great", which may not be the most important word in the phrase "great ice dome" -- great as opposed to what?
    (At any rate, in a few hours we'll be able to read what the director thinks himself...)
    Best,
    Peter

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback! As I develop my chops I think "dynamic" will be a little more "dynamic"—I still battle with that feeling that I'm "over the top" when in reality I'm more "scratching the surface". This forum is an incredibly valuable tool to listen to folks at all points along their training. I've already learned a great deal from the frequent posters here, so thank you!
    Pete—thanks for getting me to think a little differently about the script. I can see that will be an easy trap for me to fall into. In retrospect, I just did a Google search on "bolshoi"—it appears it means "large" or "grand" (as opposed to "maly" which means "small, lesser, or little"—I guess this would've been good to know *before* recording, but maybe I got lucky this time!). I would've figured Bolshoi was the name of some prominent figure in Russian history, LOL!

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    Titanic - The Exhibition

    Script:

    Welcome to Titanic - The Exhibition. Please remain in this orientation area while we introduce the tour and explain how this easy-to-use device can make your exhibition experience more rewarding. Before we begin, please take a look at your listening device. You can select any numbered object in the exhibit simply by typing in its number by using the keyboard on the front of the wand. Feel free to spend as much time as you wish at any site. You can proceed by simply pressing the green button to advance to the next object in sequence or make your own selection by typing in its corresponding number. Please enjoy your tour and this very special exhibition experience. Now please move to station number 2 as we introduce your guide- Sir Sean Connery.

    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear actingmaven's recording

    This is my new mic. In fact, my whole new studio. Please tell me how it sounds, if the levels are good, and how the room sounds. I'm anxious to hear if I need any more sound-proofing and what you think of the vocal.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-84787/script-recording-72435.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I am still learning as well but I think you sound very good you have good pronunciation. The one thing I did here and I am working on fixing too is I hear you take a breath in the middle of some of the shorter sentences. Like I said I am still learning but you sounded great to me keep up the good work!

    Professional Feedback:

    Good morning and thank you for choosing me to do your checkup!

    I think this sounds good. Its a little edgy (harsh) in the upper mid-range and on the "s" sounds, but not a show stopper. You could try adjusting your mic position a bit to help tame this a bit. I don't hear any issues with your room and for this type of material your delivery is appropriate. Nice job!

    Thank you again and have a great day!

    Dan Friedman

    Professional Feedback by Edge Studio Coach July 8, 2014 at 10:48AM

    Peer Feedback:

    Sound quality is generally very good. And the narration delivery is generally very good as well.

    However, there is quite a bit of extraneous mouth noise, excessive breath sounds and some plosive problems (P's & T's). Most of that is fixable with either better mic technique or editing.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, all. This was an unedited excerpt to test my new studio set up. I'm still working on mic placement, so your comments were very helpful. Cheers!

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    Yale Virtual Tour

    Script:

    Welcome to Yale. I’m Jessica, a senior from New Hampshire. I’ll be your tour guide. To explore a location in more detail, just click on the icons. But let’s get started on the tour, to discover what makes Yale such a great place to live, and to learn.
    Welcome to Cross Campus. This is one of my favorite places here at Yale, because it connects many different aspects of student life. From here, you can see academic buildings, libraries, and residential colleges. This is also a great place to spend a sunny day, either reading a book, or spending time with some friends. Speaking of books, there are 12 million books here at Yale, and over 4 million of them are housed right over here, in Sterling Memorial Library. Its 15 floors of stacks are just one piece of an incredible amount of resources available to you, no matter what you come here to research.

    7 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jesskaufman7's recording

    This is just for practice, NOT for sound/recording quality. I recorded it on my ipad with no mic. :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-83796/script-recording-72763.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked this. I think your voice is just right for these types of reads. Acting and pacing were good. I can see you narrating pieces like this for a variety of clients. Good job.

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    Yellow River

    Script:

    The Yellow River is China's most important river in the North. The soil along much of the river is yellow in color, and that's what gives the river its name. As we cruise down the Yellow River. . . look closely at the mulberry leaves that grow along the banks. You may find them covered with silkworms. Their cocoons are spun into shiny threads, which will be woven into beautiful cloth called silk.

    See that tough, woody looking grass? That's bamboo. Bamboo forests have been cut down in the past to make room for houses, but now China is working to protect the bamboo, which is essential to the diet of panda bears.

    15 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Sherrill S's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-12306/script-recording-53348.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Sherrill - your voice sounds really nice, articulate and clear. I think this is a really good type of read for you. The only thing I would say is to close your eyes and envision this scenery. How would you describe it to a friend after you had been there? I think you might have more emotion behind it. Try to imagine how pretty and complex this place is and actually hear birds in the background. Hear the sound of you paddling very slowly through this river. That is how I would try to get the emotion of presenting this beautiful place. Just some thoughts! This is what helps me! Marianne

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Marianne. I was trying to envision talking to my niece as we cruised down the Yellow River. I guess I need to work on making that even more vivid in my mind since that is not coming through in the recording.

    Peer Feedback:

    Sherrill - I wouldn't be too hard on yourself. I've taken some of these walking, riding and cruising audio tours and most are much, much flatter than your read. What MHeyden proposes will only enhance an already good read.

    Peer Feedback:

    Read sounds nice, clear and articulate. Would liked a little bit more energy.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks James and EStaton. I agree with your energy comment. My nature is to be calm and quiet and I have not quite found that key to unlock the feeling of energy behind my voice. I hear that energy when I listen to professional VO talents but I can't seem to get it in my reads.

    Peer Feedback:

    I enjoyed the read for the most part...the previous comments are quite good. Additionally, I would strongly suggest looking into a De-ess filter as this had some pretty strident 's' sounds through my AKG headphones and confirmed through my monitors. Good luck!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, TxTom. I will look into that.

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    American Museum Of Natural History

    Script:

    Since 1869, the American Museum of Natural History has sponsored thousands of scientific expeditions around the globe in an effort to unravel the world’s greatest mysteries. It is this passion to discover and to understand that inspires Discovery Tours, the Museums’ educational travel program. Participants in the Discovery Tours travel program have the unique opportunity to explore the world with Museum scientists as they continue to uncover new insights into the nature of life on earth. Since 1953, over 12,000 museum travelers have participated in Discovery Tours to some of the world’s greatest wildlife areas, archaeological sites and cultural centers.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 9 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Animal Planet Stadium Welcome

    Script:

    Welcome to the Animal Planet Stadium in Silver Spring Maryland where the event of the year has gone to the dogs. The top puppy players from all over the country have been training for this moment all season long..

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 6 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Baseball Hall Of Fame

    Script:

    Welcome to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The first stop on your journey is the Cooperstown Room where you will come face to face with ten electees who were present for that first induction ceremony in 1939. Here rare vintage photographs trace the origin of the game. Next comes the Great Moments Room where the game’s most famous events evoke more recollections. Legendary artists have also captured these special occasions on canvas, and Abbott and Costello entertain you with their classic parody, “Who’s on First?”Welcome to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The first stop on your journey is the Cooperstown Room where you will come face to face with ten electees who were present for that first induction ceremony in 1939. Here rare vintage photographs trace the origin of the game. Next comes the Great Moments Room where the game’s most famous events evoke more recollections. Legendary artists have also captured these special occasions on canvas, and Abbott and Costello entertain you with their classic parody, “Who’s on First?”

    Located on Main Street, in the heart of picturesque Cooperstown, New York, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is one of the country's major tourist destinations - and is surely the best-known sports shrine in the world.

    Opening its doors for the first time on June 12, 1939, the Hall of Fame has stood as the definitive repository of the game's treasures and as a symbol of the most profound individual honor bestowed on an athlete. It is every fan's "Field of Dreams" with its stories, legends and magic to be passed on from generation to generation.

    The centerpiece of the Museum is the historic Hall of Fame Gallery, where the plaques of every Hall of Fame member line the oak walls. In the front section of the Gallery, visitors will see artifacts representing the most recent class of Hall of Famers.

    Recordings:

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    Belt With Flowers And Cartouche

    Script:

    This artist takes Raphael's picture as his model, but does away with the poetry and idealization, rendering her instead as an object of desire. Take a moment to look at its fine details: the pattern of tiny flowers woven with silver and gold silk thread…the silver border… and the rectangles, or cartouches, lined in red. Each displays a word from a passionate love poem. The basic design for the belt with flowers and cartouche came from a popular pattern book of the 16th century, indicated here by the precision of the embroidery. But the lettering is irregular and slightly misshapen, suggesting that whoever wove this belt chose the poem and also added the phoenixes, working without any kind of template

    Recordings:

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    Boston University

    Script:

    Wondering what it’s like to be a student at Boston University? Take one of our virtual tours to learn about the lives of some of our students and their varying backgrounds, in- terests and majors.
    Freshmen can learn more about what to expect during their rst year at BU including time management, how college di ers from high school, and what living in a residence hall is really like.
    Interested in the person you could become with a degree from Boston University? Check out the Senior Experience tour to learn from students who “know the ropes”. Find out about the challenges and rigors of various majors, the bene ts of internships, and prepar- ing for the world a er graduation.

    Recordings:

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    Boston University

    Script:

    Wondering what it's like to be a student at Boston University? Take one of our virtual tours to learn about the lives of some of our students and their varying backgrounds, interests and majors.

    Freshmen can learn more about what to expect during their first year at BU including time management, how college differs from high school, and what living in a residence hall is really like.

    Interested in the person you could become with a degree from Boston University? Check out the Senior Experience tour to learn from students who "know the ropes". Find out about the challenges and rigors of various majors, the benefits of internships, and preparing for the world after graduation.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 13 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    British Museum

    Script:

    Every Visitor to the British Museum knows the huge, winged and human headed bulls which stand over ten tons. of black basalt, glossy and sinister, they are overpowering in their brutal strength. They and nearly all the Assyrian carved and sculpted reliefs in the gallery behind them, were pried from their foundations by crowbars, hauled by ropes till they toppled on to specially built platforms, moved on rollers across miles of dessert under a burning sun, winched aboard the ship and brought down the Persian Gulf to Bombay, then around the Cape of Good Hope -- to the Port of London. All under the supervision of Henry Layard over one hundred years ago.

    Recordings:

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    California State Parks

    Script:

    Welcome to the California State Park’s Directory of Natural Resources. California’s parks are here for the entire family to enjoy. They’re your parks, and we urge you to abide by basic conservation guidelines. On days designated as “dry days,” please do not light matches or start fires of any kind in any of our parks. The threat of forest fires is of constant concern to California Foresters. Campfires are permitted, but in designated Campfire Zones only. All state parks are open at 7 a.m. and close at sundown. Please adhere to this rule for your own safety and protection. We would like you to come back often and take advantage of California’s great outdoors. After all, you make it work.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 10 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Guide Book Sample

    Script:

    The river Arno consists of four bridges , the most admired bridge being Ponte St. Trinita.

    The Ponte Santa Trinita is the oldest elliptic arch bridge in the world. This bridge is admired for its unique and beautiful architecture consisting of only three arches, giving the bridge the appearance of almost being flat. The bridge was constructed by the Florentine Architect Bartolomeo Ammanati from 1567 to 1569. On August 8th, 1944 the bridge was destroyed by retreating German Troops but reconstructed in 1958 with original stones raised from the Arno. The missing head of Primavera was recovered from the bed of the Arno in October of 1961.

    Visitors to Florence can still enjoy the view captured in the beautiful engraving from the 1847 Handbook for Travellers in Northern Italy by standing on the north bank of the Arno River and looking southeast toward the bridge. Many of the landmarks seen in the original engraving are still visible.

    7 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear WK White's recording

    I'm very interested in narration, and I'd appreciate any comments about my delivery and pace. Also, please let me know what you think of the audio quality; this file has no compression, EQ or other effects applied.

    /sites/default/files/GuideBookSample_WendyKayWhite.mp3

    Professional Feedback:

    Hi Wendy;
    Generally speaking, you have all the tools and the vocal capacity to do this. So that said, let's discuss getting to the next step in this professional market:

    Your demo is hissing when you use S. So we are getting lots of sssss and that need to be cleaned up in the studio.

    Your pacing is nice but I would slow you down just a bit. The more natural pacing, the more you are able to modulate and emphasize content.

    Most novice narrators are very wary about "dramatizing" their reading and for good reason - directors like clean, well paced readings. But trust me, you can deliver with variations of emphasis and speed that will greatly enhance your impact.

    The best tour narrations are a combination of information and engaging delivery. The listener has dozens of distractions and things about them to see... your job is to focus and guide their viewing through your delivery.

    For example: you deliver the sentence about the bridge being destroyed by retreating German troops in the same cadence and lyrical style in which you tell us about how the bridge is admired.... therein lies the difference between really capturing a listener and just reading a script.

    The secret is to think about what you are saying and envisioning it as a dramatic narrative (without turning it into a stage monologue). You have to spend lots of time underlining key phrases, shift in tempo, points of emphasis and tonal changes. Your script will end up with numerous marks and annotations.

    With your voice (lilting and clear, comfortable to listen to and rich in nuance), this is just a matter of practice and direction.

    A case in point" "Many of the landmarks seen in the original engraving are still visible" is a sentence with about three points of vocal emphasis.... "Many"...Seen in the ORIGINAL engraving" ... STILL VISIBLE". Using this as an example, go back and review the script; see where you need to focus, emphasize and pause.

    THINK about what you are reading and how you are delivering it. Novices tend to look at a script as a totality. Pros look at every sentence and break it down. In the recording session will be a director, historian/author and a technician. They will discuss every line with you (including the obvious interpretations) and you will discover how each sentence is meant to convey something they thought important.

    I think you are a great candidate to develop your skills ... you have the basic (and much sought after) vocal skills. Just some practice and guidance will be a great help to you.

    Good luck!
    Steve

    Professional Feedback by Edge Studio Coach March 19, 2011 at 11:22AM

    Peer Feedback:

    WK-
    This is nice. I can picture myself being guided through the various interesting aspects of the bridge you describe. The pace is good for this piece. I would try a little more emotion in some of the descriptions of, say the bridge being destroyed by the Germans and the missing head of Primavera being discovered. Overall, nicely done.

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    Cornell Interactive Campus Tour

    Script:

    Cornell University's Ithaca campus, set amid waterfalls, gorges, lakes, and rolling hills in the Finger Lakes region of central New York State, provides some of the most breathtaking scenery you'll find anywhere. You'll also find a whole, new world of social and intellectual possibilities, exciting adventures, and lasting friendships waiting for you at Cornell. University housing units on campus include traditional residence halls, program houses, and cooperative residences. There are fraternities and sororities, as well as rooms and apartments off campus. One of the university's primary missions is to provide a safe, comfortable residential experience while educating and challenging Cornell students to achieve academic and personal growth.

    Recordings:

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    Dr Seuss From Then To Now

    Script:

    By now you should be standing in front of a series of world-famous children's books created by Dr. Seuss - beginning with number 88 on your left: Green Eggs and Ham.

    It's no doubt familiar to you and your family - over 1.5 million copies have been sold annually since its creation in 1960. In fact, even forty years after its debut, children still mail the author green eggs and ham. By the time this book appeared in bookstores and libraries in 1960, Dr. Seuss had become an industry.

    Take a moment and study the outrageous colors and free-spirited style the characters are rendered in. Look at the cover. It's quite unlike the traditional Dick and Jane books so popular before Dr. Seuss. You probably are already pretty familiar with the verse. But note how it all comes together on the pages displayed - the art, the verse, the design, the colors... even the size of the book itself. Not a wasted inch or unnecessary verse. It's all a symphony of very well orchestrated nonsense. And like all of his creations... it works; wonderfully.

    Recordings:

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    Gordon College

    Script:

    Hello,
    Welcome to Gordon College!
    My name is Stephen and I will be your tour guide. This tour begins just outside the tunnel that goes under College Drive near the flag pole. We will tour East campus, then West Campus, and will end up back here at the tunnel.
    Periodically, I will ask you to pause the recording so that you can walk to the next point or take a few minutes to independently tour the area. I will always use the word "pause" when you need to pause the recording. I will always use the word "stop" when you need to stop walking while I continue speaking.
    This tour is intended to be listened to while walking around campus and does not include tours of any of the buildings. If you are taking this tour on a day when the buildings are open then please feel free to pause and enter the buildings along the way. In order to benefit the most from this recording remember to return to the spot on the tour where you paused the recording or to the spot where you were directed to go.

    Recordings:

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    Great Moments On Broadway

    Script:

    Who wouldn't want to resurrect Fanny Brice? She was a wonderful entertainer. And since Fanny herself could not be brought back, the next best thing was to get a young Barbara Streisand to sing and strut and go through comic routines a la Brice. Streisand was, in 1964, well on her way to becoming a splendid entertainer in her own right, and in Funny Girl, she went as far as any performer could toward recalling the laughter and joy that was Fanny Brice.

    But this Tony winning show was about much more than a tribute to the buffoonery of Ms Brice. It was also intent on telling the story of how Fanny loved and lost Nick Arnstein, and it was both sentimental and touching.

    These costumes and sets reflected everything from Ziegfield's Follies to Brice's dressing room and a Circle Line cruise ship. The most famous was this stairway in which Streisand as a pregnant Fanny - amidst a bevy of chorus girls and beneath this grand chandelier - enters in this wedding gown and got the most resounding laugh of the evening.

    Streisand performed over 1,348 nights ... and cemented her career as a Broadway phenomena.

    Recordings:

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    Haunted Hotel Spirit Dude

    Script:

    So you think you are brave enough to pass through my doors? Foolish mortals, when will you learn? Don’t you know you are not welcome here? When you walked through that door – you chose to leave your world - and enter mine! You’re in the spirit world now. We are all around you, above you, below you, and… (pause) behind you. (Sinister chuckle)

    These walls have seen many changes over the course of history - but none like you will witness here tonight.

    Move quickly and don’t look back - for one wrong turn could result in your eternal stay with us. Stay close together and follow your assigned guide; they are your only hope of making it out alive!

    (Laughter)

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    Hershey

    Script:

    Welcome to Hershey, the Great American Chocolate Town, where families come together for a taste of the sweet life. Tucked in the rolling hills of Central Pennsylvania, this idyllic escape offers the latest and greatest in entertainment and hospitality, fused with the traditions of one of America's original success stories. Even the smiles seem sweeter! With attractions, accommodations, amenities and activities in all flavors, a trip to “The Sweetest Place on Earth” is an easy treat.

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    Hershey Tour

    Script:

    Welcome to Hershey, the Great American Chocolate Town, where families come together for a taste of the sweet life. Tucked in the rolling hills of Central Pennsylvania, this idyllic escape offers the latest and greatest in entertainment and hospitality, fused with the traditions of one of America's original success stories. Even the smiles seem sweeter! With attractions, accommodations, amenities and activities in all flavors, a trip to “The Sweetest Place on Earth” is an easy treat.

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    Jacques Louis David's -"Marat"

    Script:

    Jean-Paul Marat was sitting in the bathtub when he was murdered on July 13, 1793. A teacher of languages, a journalist and a physician, Marat had turned out to be one of the most radical demagogues the French Revolution produced. He spent much of his time in his tub to find relief from a chronic skin rash. He wore a compress on his head to relieve headaches from which he also suffered. While he was bathing on this fateful day, he was reading a letter from Charlotte Corday, the great grand-daughter of the playwright Pierre Corneille. The young noblewoman had tried in vain to gain admittance to Marat. Now she had sent him a letter slyly suggesting a tete-a-tete. He let her in and she stabbed him. Marat died instantly.

    Many contemporaries were pleased with the deed. Marat had been a tough customer. He had had 860 gallows erected to deal with his political enemies and had sent over 200,000 of them to the gallows.

    David was a fervent revolutionary and a personal friend of Marat. He obliged by by rendering Marat's corpse on canvas just as he had had it put on public display; with his bare chest and wounds visible. The image became a symbol of the French Revolution. It was placed on a church altar, smothered under billowing clouds of incense. It replaced crucifixes and Royal portraits. But soon after, this personality cult ended, the painting put in hiding and Marat's heart, once placed beneath the painting, was burned and the ashes scattered in the Montmartre sewer.

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    Jamaica

    Script:

    Jamaica...an island of extraordinary beauty, colorful flowers, cascading waterfalls, dramatic mountain ranges and spectacular seascapes. An island of romance and enchantment...Jamaica. Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean, located just south of Cuba. Daily flights arrive from New York, Miami, San Juan, Toronto, Montreal and London into Jamaica's two airports in Montego Bay and Kingston.

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    Kingsborough Community College – Interactive Tour

    Script:

    We’re glad to bring Kingsborough Community College to your home. Within this interactive guided tour, you’ll visit our modern campus – located on 71 acres and surrounded by the waters of Sheepshead Bay, Jamaica Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean. Just click “start” to begin your tour. Thanks…let’s begin. Did you know that Kingsborough offers outstanding education leading to an Associate in liberal arts and sciences?

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    Library Of Congress Acoustic Guide

    Script:

    Welcome to the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress. You have just come in through the west ground level entrance, under the granite archway. Start your visit here, at the Visitor's Center, where volunteers and automated information kiosks will help to answer your questions. On this level you'll also find the Sales Shop, a cloakroom, restrooms, and the theater where you can see a short film about the Library of Congress. Next, walk up the staircase on the south side of the Visitor's Center, or take one of the elevators, and go up one floor to the Great Hall. You are now in the center of the Great Hall. From here you will be able to appreciate the grandeur of the architecture. The ceiling, 75 feet above the marble floor, is decorated with stained glass skylights supported by elaborately paneled beams finished in aluminum leaf. In the center of the marble floor is a large brass inlay shaped like a sun, on which are inscribed the four cardinal points of the compass.

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    Library Preservation

    Script:

    Our knowledge of ourselves and the world around us grows only through the accumulation of countless bits of information, laid down like bricks as a foundation for wisdom. Libraries are the intellectual brickyards of our civilization, fundamental to our survival and growth. This is the largest library in the world. More than 84 million items are housed in three buildings on 535 miles of shelves. The accumulated facts, fantasies, philosophies, and fears of mankind are brought here in every medium yet devised to record information.

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    Metropolitan Museum

    Script:

    The Museum's collection of Old Master and nineteenth-century European paintings—one of the greatest such collections in existence—numbers approximately 2,200 works, dozens of which are instantly recognizable worldwide. The French, Italian, and Dutch schools are most strongly represented, with fine works also by British, Netherlandish, German, Spanish, and Flemish masters. The department's holdings—which consist not only of paintings on canvas and wood but also of frescoes, oil sketches, and finished pastels on paper, as well as a small number of Greek and Russian icons—range in date from the twelfth through the nineteenth century. Among its many masterpieces are exceptional assemblages of the work of the French Impressionists.

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    Museum Of Fine Arts, Boston - Guided Tour

    Script:

    Few Old Masters are as enduringly popular as Rembrandt and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, is proud to exhibit “Rembrandt’s Journey: Painter – Draftsman – Etcher.” The exhibition reveals the all-encompassing scope of the artist’s interests via his paintings, etchings and drawings. Beginning with Rembrandt’s constant and unflinching depictions of his own face, his pen and brush captured an unprecedented array of subjects…

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    Neue Galerie

    Script:

    In spring 2011, the Neue Galerie will present an exhibition entitled Vienna 1900: Style and Identity. The show will be curated by Christian Witt-Dörring and Jill Lloyd. It aims to reveal a common thread running through the fine and decorative arts in turn-of-the-century Vienna: the redefinition of individual identity in the modern age.
    Major works by fine artists Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, and Egon Schiele will be on view, as well as furniture by architects Otto Wagner and Adolf Loos, and decorative artists Josef Hoffmann and Koloman Moser. There will be a special emphasis on fashion, with loans of key clothing and accessories from the period. The exhibition will also explore the overlap with new attitudes towards gender and sexuality that surface in Viennese literature and psychology at the time.

    8 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jdaddona's recording

    Hello. I'm new to the industry and would love to work in the cultural arena. I'm looking for general feedback to see if my reading is appropriate to museum voice overs. Then in particular, is my pronunciation of foreign names appropriate? Also, I'm trying to lose my Connecticut accent and sound more neutral. If I don't exactly succeed at that, does this sound acceptable? Thank you so much.

    /sites/default/files/Daddona - Neue Galerie reading_0.mp3

    Professional Feedback:

    In general, the pronunciation of the German names sound a bit "Americanized," but inasmuch as you are indeed an American, this is acceptable within certain parameters. A more clearly enunciated umlaut sound in Doerring's name (less like "during," more like "murder")would be good; "Kockoshka" rather than "Cocoa-shka" for Kokoschka would be better, and Loos is pronounced with a somewhat long and "narrow" "o" sound, akin to the "o" in "nor" (not a "u" sound, as the double "oo" in English). In terms of voice and delivery quality, I think you have a nice and comfortable sound - very easy to listen to. Feel free to vary delivery ... these tours can easily temp the voice to a certain tonal delivery that can, after a time, become dry and overly pedantic. There is nothing wrong with a bit more dramatic and varied delivery. "Special"..."redefinition"..."key" ...are opportunities for emphasis. Remember that the challenge of audio touring is to keep the listener engaged and attentive. And to draw their attention to what is before them without having them dismiss either the narration or the object. It's a delicate balance but you have the tools to successfully master it.

    Professional Feedback by Edge Studio Coach February 23, 2011 at 8:35AM

    Peer Feedback:

    Most excellent. You have the perfect voice and delivery for the cultural arena. I can most definitely hear your voice in a museum setting, but also in the commercial/narrative genres as well. The read flowed very well. In the last sentence you said toward instead of towards, but that was essentially it. You've a great career ahead of you.

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    New York's Upper East Side

    Script:

    Let's begin our tour here, by the statue of William Tecumseh Sherman on Fifty-Ninth Street and Fifth Avenue.

    You are standing in the midst of the Upper East Side - justifiably considered New York's "Gold Coast" with Fifth Avenue its "Millionaires' Row". It is in this neighborhood that Lady Caroline Astor countenanced the four hundred most important New Yorkers (those who would attend her illustrious parties); it is on these streets that J.P. Morgan had built - "damning the expense" - his famous Metropolitan Club; and it is here that the longest single uninterrupted set of mansions once stood. If there ever was a competition for wealth and power in one neighborhood, the Upper East Side would win hands down.

    Yet, despite its undeniable standing as an area of prominence and renown, the Upper East Side has a much broader appeal. The neighborhood maintains a diversity to its history that is often overlooked amid the goings-on of Manhattan's haute bourgeoisie.

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    New Zealand

    Script:

    New Zealand has to be seen to be believed. Its unusual cities are gateways to the dramatically beautiful countryside, with superb open spaces, emerald hills, and snow-tipped alpine mountains. It is also a land of wonderful waters, waterfalls, geysers, endless inland seas, and a coastline bordered by miles of broad, clean beaches. Since it’s a land with so many things to do and see, you’ll want to plan your vacation carefully, based on your tastes, time, and budget. This video offers you a menu of individual options to choose from ... everything you need for an unforgettable New Zealand holiday.

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    Nile

    Script:

    Standing proud and magnificent on the banks of the legendary Nile is the only remaining Wonder of the Ancient World; the Great Pyramids and Sphinx at Giza. Travel to the edge of the desert plateau with your guide Omar Sharif, for an ancient unprecedented look into the secret passageways and chambers of these colossal and mysterious monuments. Mysteries of the Pyramids will answer some of the darkest questions that have haunted man for century upon century.

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    Philadelphia Audio Tour

    Script:

    Welcome to Sonic Tours Independence National Park tour. We are delighted that you’ve joined us us on this self guided walking tour of one of America’s most historic and fascinating cities, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This walking tour will bring us to many sites and structures of historic importance in Independence Park. We’ll discover many of the dwellings and meeting places that were part of America’s fight for independence from Britain. This self guided tour will allow you not only to learn about this historic city, but best of all, you can visit the sites at your own pace. You may see an irresistable restaurant along the way, or a quaint shop that is too good to pass up. Feel free to partake in all the city has to offer. Our tour will always be waiting for you, and is just a click away. When you hear the bell toll during the tour, this is a signal to pause your player and move on to the next tour stop.

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    • Alyx September 8, 2010
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    Prairie Pothole Region

    Script:

    This is the prairie pothole region, a mosaic of grasses and wetlands. These tall grasses and wild flowers, deep rooted and resilient, thrive in the rich soil surrounding the wetlands- a haven for an incredible diversity of life.

    Recordings:

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    Red Rocks Guided Audio Tour

    Script:

    Welcome to Red Rocks Park and amphitheatre. Around you are 868 acres of pines and prairie, spectacular vistas, and geological wonders. At 6,450 feet above sea level, Red Rocks is situated in a unique transitional zone where the Great Plains meet the Rocky Mountains. As the earth gradually moved together, the sandstone ledges that you see around you were raised from the prehistoric ocean floor to form these dramatic, three hundred-foot "walls."

    53 people have played this

    Demo Recording:

    Click to hear Lenox Powell's recording

    Hello! I'm thinking about using this script for my demo, but I'm still in the early stages. So it's for both demo-prep and practice recording. I also purchased my very first mic (a Shure KSM32/SL) a few months ago and am still getting used to "working" it. ANY and all feedback is appreciated. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/RedRocksaudioguidedtour-7232013.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Beautiful voice. A couple of unnecessary short pauses: after "Welcome," "acres," "Red Rocks," "zone," "Plains," and "floor." In other words, your delivery could be a tiny bit smoother. Also, amphitheater is pronounced as if it were spelled "amfi...," not "ampi..." But again, a very nice voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    lenoxapowell --
    great voice with really crisp enunciation. the mic sounds great and your recording environment sounded pretty clean (admittedly only listened on laptop speakers).

    But, the flow seems a little choppy and slow. This script seems like it's a tour guide, so I think it should have more emotion or excitement -- talking about vistas, and wonders and dramatic walls....etc, and your audience is this tour bus full of excited listeners.

    hoping this is helpful,
    cheers,
    Dave Saunders.

    Peer Feedback:

    Yes, I think it's choppy, too. Nice voice with it, and I like the copy for you. Having the audio in only one ear made it harder for me to evaluate recording quality. I hear some hollowness and maybe some sibilance? Could be a processing artifact. I'm not sure on that. I think it's close, though, and always like to listen to you, Lenox, whether it's on the forum or on Saturdays. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Very helpful comments, thank you! I was definitely going for the audio guided tour, either with someone listening on a headset, tour bus, etc. so I was trying to go slow and give the audience time to take in what I was saying. But I struggle with going slower and giving appropriate and ample pauses, without sounding choppy. Having your ears listen to it and provide this feedback is so valuable and I really appreciate it. I'll definitely practice more and try to smooth out my read and add more emotion. Thank you!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Try breaking it copy down by clauses and phrases. If there's a group of words that go together, try to make certain there aren't excessive glottal stops in between them. Otherwise clarity and articulation will be getting in the way of flow. I think it's Randye Kaye who says she writes a curvy line above words that go together and waves her hand in a sweeping gesture as she reads them to get a certain flow.

    Ex. "Welcome to Red Rocks Park and Amphitheater" is one thought and should flow together. Not slur together, but closer in that direction with less closing of your mouth and stopping of your breath in your throat in between words.

    Peer Feedback:

    I also noticed that the sound was only coming into my left ear and that was a bit disconcerting. Overall, though, I liked your read and love your voice. You and I both could use the advice about groups of words that go together.

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    46 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear nickpmathews's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2433/script-recording-67900.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good strong voice! you may want to check the inflection "large Icy palace" sounds a bit like you are saying an inside joke, go a bit more conversational.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Nick,
    I agree with ghostkeeper-- some of your inflections seem a bit odd. "...but would sound more natural in English" seems to me like you're about to let us in on an exciting secret, but the copy may not call for that. Just my still-newbie 2c.
    Best,
    Peter

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    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear McDoogle's recording

    Hey everyone! For this read, I thought I would try something a little more dramatic instead of the usual "friendly and casual" tone so common these days, at there was a lot of "mystery" flying around the script. What do you think?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6430/script-recording-26858.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    878 - I think the music was competing with your voice. I don't know if you can boost your input or lower the music. I like what you are doing, but you sound far away from the mic, which takes me out of the intimacy I usually hear on these kinds of things. Also a minor pronunciation note: it sounded like o-MAR instead of O-mar Sharif. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    You sounded nice, but I kept getting distracted by the music. I'd like to hear it with quieter/no music :)

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    71 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear kenlocke's recording

    Hi everyone. I am new to this after years of prodding by people I know to explore voice over work. This is my very first recording. I am just looking for some general advise. I don't have a professional studio. I am just looking to refine my approach and get some introductory guidance. Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-84704/script-recording-83786.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    No reason not to explore the wonderful world of VO. It's not just for announcers any more.

    One thing that you will want to deal with is your breathing. Yes, we all breath in odd places when we have normal conversations with other people, but I hear many more breaths in this passage than are actually needed. Nerves play a big role here, especially when you're new behind the mic - it can be intimidating at first. And hearing yourself through headphones as you speak is also strange for some people, at least at first. We don't hear ourselves as others hear us, so we compensate by thinking we're not being expressive enough or loud enough or articulate enough. So we breathe more without stringing more words together. The results are that we sound choppy and the sentences don't flow out the way they would in conversation.

    One exercise is to take a deep breath, put your index finger in front of your mouth and blow out the air slowly and controlled for a 5 count, then a 7 count, then a 10 count, then a 12 count and so on until you build up to a place where it doesn't take a lot of effort and/or you don't get light headed. Then try it by gradually stringing a lot of words together to see where you need to breathe. (I would submit that here, there are only 3 to 4 necessary breaths that need to be taken. In your read, I counted 9 breaths.)

    Something else that coaching will help you with is breaking down the copy and becoming more "conversational" in your delivery. It's the difference between just reading words into a microphone and having those words connect with and have meaning to your listener. They will ask you to pick a friend or relative and talk to them like you would in your back yard or over the phone and not the vast unwashed masses out there.

    These are foundational things to build on. Even the pros continue to get coaching as trends change. Connecting with a good VO coach would be your next step.

    Peer Feedback:

    There was a fair amount of background noise in your recording.

    Peer Feedback:

    like your tone

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi kenlocke,
    Welcome to the forum! First off, advice from James is always golden, and he is right on the money. There are some great youtube videos also which help walk you through diaphramatic breathing that may be helpful as well. I second everything James says. It's hard too when you just start out, and become so aware of minute things when speaking which never occurred to you before. Just play on your mic every day, getting comfortable with it, and yourself. The practice scripts are great.

    And on the up side, you have a very nice soothing voice, so you've got a great place to start from :)

    Peer Feedback:

    The "P" plosive on the first line's "Standing Proud" was pretty powerful. Not sure if it happened anywhere else but I'm thinking you may be working without a pop filter.

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    4 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear bnstone's recording

    Working on trying some different genres and on reducing dialect..tell me what you think...

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2270/script-recording-13774.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Bruce, sounds good. Pacing was great, but I think this needs a little more energy and drama to entice the interest of the viewer/listener. Additionally, it seems you had trouble with a few words like "haunted", and "Sphinx." These to me sounded like HAUTED and SPHIX. I didn't hear the "N"in those words too well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Bruce. I liked your voice but there were too many long pauses in the reading. You dropped the 'g' from 'remaining', and 'guide' sounded like 'God' and I agree with Javier about the energy.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks guys, this is the kind of feedback I need. I'm trying to ease away from my Southern dialect on some reads and I find myself struggling with pronunciation and remaining smooth while thinking about reading without an accent. I appreciate the comments.

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you did a great job of neutralizing your natural dialect, and clearly, the pauses people are mentioning are a result of the great effort you are making. As you continue to practice, your pronunciations will become even cleaner and the pauses will go away on their own once you stop becoming so conscious of your diction.

    Well done, and in a very short time. Keep up the good work!

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    4 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Jan Anderson's recording

    Your critique is welcome. Thanks.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2089/script-recording-13677.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Really Nice Read. Assuming this is tv commercial voice-over, I thought the pace was right on. Great Voice and without going 'movie trailer', I might give it just one more small notch-up of emotion and inflection? Just a thought. All the Best!

    Peer Feedback:

    Chris - I appreciate the suggestions and I agree. Thanks.

    Peer Feedback:

    Jan, something was missing here to really grab the listeners attention. And I suspect it was a sense of mystery and drama or more excitement that was needed. But don't misunderstand, it was a pretty good read, but I know you want to take your performances to even higher levels, so that you can eventually compete with others in the field, and that's the reason I'm being very picky with it. I did think the pacing and diction were great though.

    Peer Feedback:

    That's funny Javier, my wife said the same thing! I appreciate your tough critiques because I DO want to compete with the big boys, like I'm sure you do too. Cheers!

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    Rockwell - Colgate Toothpaste

    Script:

    At first glance, you may think this painting is another example of Rockwell telling a story about telling a story. But it's more than that… it's an advertisement. This painting was created as an ad for Colgate toothpaste.

    Rockwell understood that sometimes ads work better when you don't clunk people over the head with a hard sell.

    Rockwell used this wholesome scene of the two of you to sell an image of family and America that he hoped would make people feel warm and fuzzy and want to buy toothpaste.

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    Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear Plants

    Script:

    Let's trace TVA's nuclear history and go on a virtual tour of several of the facilities. TVA began building nuclear plants in the 1960's, responding to the growing prosperity of the Tennessee Valley and the rising demand for power.

    Today, TVA's three nuclear plants - Brown's Ferry, Sequoya, and Watts Barr - provide about 30% of TVA's power supply. The 6 operating reactors provide more than 6,900 megawatts of clean, safe and affordable electricity - enough to serve more than three-and-a-half-million homes in the Tennessee Valley.

    Have a look at these towers. Most people think that these are unique to nuclear power facilities. That's yet another urban myth. Even at our fossil fuel plants, where we burn coal, these towers are used to release wasted heat or steam into the atmosphere.

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    Tibet

    Script:

    Welcome to the Rice Museum’s special exhibit: Tibet, the Sacred Realm. The photographs you are about to see contain more than 180 images, most of which have never before been shown in public. No country in the world remains more mysterious, distant, and inaccessible than Tibet. Bordered by the massive Himalayas to the south and west, and by endless barren wastes to the north, for centuries the country’s natural isolation allowed its people to develop culture free from outside interference.

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    Titanic - The Exhibition

    Script:

    Welcome to Titanic - The Exhibition. Please remain in this orientation area while we introduce the tour and explain how this easy-to-use devise can make your exhibition experience more rewarding. Before we begin, please take a look at your listening device. You can select any numbered object in the exhibit simply by typing in its number by using the keyboard on the front of the wand. This allows you to wander freely throughout the exhibit - but we will lead you sequentially as your first choice. You will lose nothing in the narrative by moving ahead or back at your own choosing.

    Feel free to spend as much time as you wish at any site. You can proceed by simply pressing the green button to advance to the next object in sequence - or make your own selection by typing it its corresponding number.

    Please enjoy your tour and this very special exhibition experience. Now please move to station number 2 as we introduce your guide - Sir Sean Connery.

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    Top Of The Rock Observation Deck

    Script:

    Welcome to Top Of The Rock, the best views of New York City from the newly renovated 3-tiered observation deck at the summit of 30 Rockefeller Plaza. The views from all three levels of the observation deck are breathtaking. With its open-air simplicity, complete 360-degree skyline, and crystal clear panels of glass showcasing the 80-mile view, Top Of The Rock is unmatched by any other vantage point in New York City.

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    Toulouse-lautrec

    Script:

    It was, for many, the best of times - an era with the fundamental character of the future sprang forth into the daily lives of people who had, only fifty years earlier, existed in almost medieval conditions. The 1880's and 1890's saw the first rewards of the modern industrialized world in mass-produced abundance. It was the era of "more" - more bread and wine, more newspapers and books, more textiles and fashionable garments and opportunities for modish extravagance. There were more places to go - music halls and vaudeville shows and popular entertainment at the circus, the race tracks, and brothels; more fun to be had and pipers to pay.

    The fin de siècle brought the dawning of a new age and a new attitude toward life in France. And its greatest recorder of life and living in this period was a disfigured genius - a chronicler of all that was urbane and celebrated, a master of imagery and tragic figure whose life paralleled this bohemian revel: Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec.

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    Tuft’s University – Campus Tour

    Script:

    We’re happy to bring Tufts University to your home. Within this interactive guided tour, you’ll visit our Somerville campus, located 10 minutes from Boston. Just click “start” to begin your tour, and press F2 to go back. Now let’s begin…Founded in 1852, Tufts University is recognized among the premier universities in the United States. Tufts also enjoys a global reputation for academic excellence... and for the preparation of students as leaders in a wide range of professions. A Research I university, Tufts has extensive and highly regarded liberal arts, sciences, and engineering programs that draw outstanding students from around the world with the highest academic achievement.

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    UCLA

    Script:

    Part of selecting a university is knowing what the campus looks like: its classrooms, its lecture halls, its recreational facilities, its student housing. Of course, we think the UCLA campus is both beautiful and brawny. We've got the picturesque buildings and grounds, but we also have state-of-the-art computing facilities, Web portals personalized to your specifications, student stores stocked with everything from toothpaste to computers, award-winning faculty, over 500 student clubs and organizations...the stuff you need to stay connected and make your time at UCLA count. Come see for yourself; there are lots of ways to visit us.

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    UNC Asheville Website

    Script:

    Welcome to The University of North Carolina at Asheville, and to the kind of education that changes lives and inspires others to do the same. With this interactive website, you can take an exciting virtual tour of the only designated liberal arts institution in the University of North Carolina system. Small classes, a low student-faculty ratio, strong academics, valuable service-learning activities, and a diversity of meaningful experiences and relationships, on and off campus, are hallmarks of the UNC Asheville experience. We hope you will visit UNC Asheville to see firsthand our beautiful campus and meet the people who make this a great university, one that could have a very positive impact on your future.

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    University Of Virginia Guided Tour

    Script:

    The buildings you see here were designed by Thomas Jefferson in 1819 when the University of Virginia was founded. Jefferson hated big buildings. He thought they were ugly and conducive to disease so in designing his university he spread everything out. He also thought there should be a lot of interaction between students and professors so he designed places for them to live here on the Lawn in what he called an academical village.

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    World Trade Center Visitor Center

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    Tribute WTC Visitor Center offers a place where members of the September 11th community can connect with the thousands of visitors who come to Ground Zero daily. Through walking tours, exhibits and programs, Tribute WTCVisitor Center offers "Person to Person" History, linking those that need to understand and appreciate these historic events with those that experienced them. The Center will remain in place until the permanent WTC Memorial and Museum are completed.

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    Yellow River

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    Yellow River

    The Yellow River is China's most important river in the North. The soil along much of the river is yellow in color, and that's what gives the river its name. As we cruise down the Yellow River. . . look closely at the mulberry leaves that grow along the banks. You may find them covered with silkworms. Their cocoons are spun into shiny threads, which will be woven into beautiful cloth called silk.

    See that tough, woody looking grass? That's bamboo. Bamboo forests have been cut down in the past to make room for houses, but now China is working to protect the bamboo, which is essential to the diet of panda bears.

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